September202014
5AM
daniellemertina:

neharaysays:


A successful black woman who constantly (and openly) tells her young fans to stay in school is not welcome to speak to the students at a high school she went to. I dont know what the said principal was thinking for declining Nicki Minaj’s offer, but judging my people’s comments, I am assuming that it is based on respectability politics and moral judgement, both of which are absent from the picture when it comes to rich white dude in suits who are suppose to be our examples of success. Think about the corruption, the oppression of workers, racism, sexist, homophobia etc. that comes along with people who are usually looked up to as models of inspirations. CEOs, politicians, bankers most of who have inherited their “success” and unfortunately the legacy of the many “isms” usually required to maintain the status quo be it of wealth or power. And then comes somebody like Nicky Minaj, an immigrant Black woman raised in New York and suddenly people want to get on their high horses and play God. 


What an ignorant principal. And chances are (since schools are largely segregated by class and race) a lot of the kids she would have spoken to come from a similar background she did which would have made her presence even more valuable. 😒

daniellemertina:

neharaysays:

A successful black woman who constantly (and openly) tells her young fans to stay in school is not welcome to speak to the students at a high school she went to. I dont know what the said principal was thinking for declining Nicki Minaj’s offer, but judging my people’s comments, I am assuming that it is based on respectability politics and moral judgement, both of which are absent from the picture when it comes to rich white dude in suits who are suppose to be our examples of success. Think about the corruption, the oppression of workers, racism, sexist, homophobia etc. that comes along with people who are usually looked up to as models of inspirations. CEOs, politicians, bankers most of who have inherited their “success” and unfortunately the legacy of the many “isms” usually required to maintain the status quo be it of wealth or power. And then comes somebody like Nicky Minaj, an immigrant Black woman raised in New York and suddenly people want to get on their high horses and play God. 

What an ignorant principal. And chances are (since schools are largely segregated by class and race) a lot of the kids she would have spoken to come from a similar background she did which would have made her presence even more valuable. 😒

4AM
sonjeayiti:

Amour Creole/BET -  A 25-year-old restaurant owner was recently crowned Miss Haiti on Sunday in the Caribbean country’s capital of Port-au-Prince.
As the crowd of more than 400 people chanted her name and gave her a standing ovation, a crowned Carolyn Desert repeatedher vows: “I’m going to support the youth. I’m going to support women. I’m going to support the poor.”
Among Desert’s winning traits was her reputation for supporting artists and helping impoverished children and her wide smile, which earned her a “most photogenic” award, AP reports.
Another big moment of the night for Desert occurred during the question-and-answer portion of the pageant. According to the AP, Desert said that Haitian women have more to offer than looks: “Perseverance, courage, resilience.” Her eloquent response reportedly garnered a huge round of applause.
Desert’s closely cropped natural hair also sparked a national debate about whether competitors should embrace their natural hair instead of wearing hair extensions or straight hair like a majority of the 21 pageant participants.
As Miss Haiti 2014, Desert will compete in the Miss World competition in London in December and represent the nation on trips sponsored by Haiti’s tourism ministry.

sonjeayiti:

Amour Creole/BET -  A 25-year-old restaurant owner was recently crowned Miss Haiti on Sunday in the Caribbean country’s capital of Port-au-Prince.

As the crowd of more than 400 people chanted her name and gave her a standing ovation, a crowned Carolyn Desert repeatedher vows: “I’m going to support the youth. I’m going to support women. I’m going to support the poor.”

Among Desert’s winning traits was her reputation for supporting artists and helping impoverished children and her wide smile, which earned her a “most photogenic” award, AP reports.

Another big moment of the night for Desert occurred during the question-and-answer portion of the pageant. According to the AP, Desert said that Haitian women have more to offer than looks: “Perseverance, courage, resilience.” Her eloquent response reportedly garnered a huge round of applause.

Desert’s closely cropped natural hair also sparked a national debate about whether competitors should embrace their natural hair instead of wearing hair extensions or straight hair like a majority of the 21 pageant participants.

As Miss Haiti 2014, Desert will compete in the Miss World competition in London in December and represent the nation on trips sponsored by Haiti’s tourism ministry.

(via peopleofthediaspora)

4AM
sapphrikah:

Ohhhhhh my god.

sapphrikah:

Ohhhhhh my god.

(Source: misterand, via whoresandcrumpets)

4AM

thefinestbitches:

Joia John

(Source: badassgyals, via whoresandcrumpets)

4AM
elias-williams:

Maurita Reid, 2014
Maurita is St. Albans native and professional basketball player. Reid is a graduate of the University of Miami and was named to the ACC All-Defensive team for the 2007-08 season. Reid attended Monroe Community College before transferring to Miami. She was named the NJCAA All-Tournament MVP and completed her collegiate career averaging 16.1 points, 4.39 steals and 3.5 assists per game. Maurita has played professional basketball overseas for the past 7 years and will be playing in poland this year.

elias-williams:

Maurita Reid, 2014

Maurita is St. Albans native and professional basketball player. Reid is a graduate of the University of Miami and was named to the ACC All-Defensive team for the 2007-08 season. Reid attended Monroe Community College before transferring to Miami. She was named the NJCAA All-Tournament MVP and completed her collegiate career averaging 16.1 points, 4.39 steals and 3.5 assists per game. Maurita has played professional basketball overseas for the past 7 years and will be playing in poland this year.

4AM

Consider the history of borders. Starting with the Berlin Conference of 1884 when seven European countries carved out their stakes on the continent, Africa was gradually broken down into an illogical clutter of nation-states. The borders of these states had no regard for historical groupings and identities, and shifted depending on what was most politically and economically expedient for the colonising country. At different points during the first half of the century, for example, Burkina Faso was part of Côte d’Ivoire, Niger, Mali and Senegal, before eventually coagulating as the Republic of Upper Volta.

In the early 1960s, as more African states gained “independence” and moved towards establishment of the Organisation of African Unity, border blues drove one of the earliest rifts in continental politics. The “Casablanca group” of states led by Kwame Nkrumah advocated a radical approach to African unification, while the “Monrovia group” led by Leopold Senghor called for a more conservative approach, one that held the borders of nation-states in higher esteem.

The Monrovia group won, and one of the first resolutions of the OAU was to endorse colonial borders. Today, there are only a few African countries – Comoros, Madagascar, Mozambique, Rwanda and Seychelles – that allow all Africans either to enter without visas or to obtain visas upon arrival. For the rest, fellow Africans have to jump through hoops whose variations in complexity often reflect larger political dynamics. It seems that what has infiltrated our psyche even deeper than colonial geography is the spirit that inspired the origin of borders: perceptions of superiority and inferiority, the violence of competition for resources, selective openness determined by levels of perceived threat and historical animosity. And questions of historical clarity are chronically present.

Where did the vision of division come from? How does it stay alive? Who teaches you to hate your neighbour? Official classifications along invisible lines were both symptoms and tools of oppression throughout the 20th century. In apartheid South Africa, pass books determined where and when Africans had the right to exist in their own land. In Rwanda, Belgium introduced identity documents with “ethnic” classifications, to nurture divisions in the incubator of rigid bureaucracy. Across the continent, people put arbitrary colonial divisions on paper and called them passports.

Whether immigrating, emigrating or just passing through, Africans suffer among the greatest indignities of cross-border travel, abroad and on the continent. Paula Akugizibwe recounts how the hand-me-down tools of divide and rule perpetuate the abuse. (via dynamicafrica)

(via contaminatedbreastcheese)

4AM
flashofgod:

Henri Cartier-Bresson, Easter Sunday, Harlem, New York City, 1947.

flashofgod:

Henri Cartier-Bresson, Easter Sunday, Harlem, New York City, 1947.

(via strugglingtobeheard)

4AM
sublimesea:

Philippe “Caza” Cazaumayou

sublimesea:

Philippe “Caza” Cazaumayou

(via midsummersnightdreamxs)

September192014

raprelated:

In the fashion world “urban” is code for “stolen from black people”.

(via blackgirlsrpretty2)

← Older entries Page 1 of 1052